A BRIEF EXPLANATION OF OUR

Human Safety and Security Management Plan

OTHER HUMAN SAFETY AND SECURITY RESOURCES

   
Use our Plan to
Develop your own
Human Safety
and Security
Management
Program
Our Human Safety and Security Plan defines a process that you can use to develop and implement your own unique Human Safety and Security Management Program.  If you follow the six steps that make up our Plan, you'll end up with a comprehensive Human Safety and Security Management Program, one that will help you to protect the people you're trying to protect. These steps are as follows:
  1. Perform a Human Safety and Security Analysis

  2. Develop your Human Safety and Security Management Program

  3. Document your Human Safety and Security Management Program

  4. Implement your Human Safety and Security Management Program

  5. Evaluate your Human Safety and Security Management Program

  6. Improve your Human Safety and Security Management Program

  As you can see, our Plan not only shows you how to develop, document, and implement a Human Safety and Security Program, it also shows you how to evaluate and improve it. The latter two sections give our Plan a dynamic influence that will help ensure that your Human Safety and Security Program continues to improve over time.

While you will start with a very general plan, you'll end up with a very specific Human Safety and Security Program, one that will meet your unique human security needs. All you need to do is follow the steps that make up our Human Safety and Security Plan.

In order to make it easier to manage and control the development of your Human Safety and Security Program, we've set it up as a Form. If you purchase our Plan, you'll notice three columns on the right hand side of every page. These columns will allow you to assign tasks to the people who'll be building your Human Safety and Security Program. In addition, you'll be able to record start and finish dates.

Security Concepts
and Definitions
In order to work with our Human Safety and Security Plan, you need to understand a few simple concepts and definitions.
  • Security Threat. A security threat is a potential hazard. A threat does not actually exist as a real event or object. It's not an actual danger. It's only a potential danger. It's still very important; it just doesn't exist in the usual way. It exists as an idea, not as an actual event or object.
  • Security Hazard. When a security threat turns into reality, it becomes a hazard. When a security threat is actualized or becomes real, it becomes a security hazard. However, at this point, people have not yet been harmed. While people may have been exposed to a hazard, it's only a potential disaster, not an actual disaster.

  • Security Disaster. When people actually come into direct contact with a hazard, you've got a real security disaster. You've got a situation in which people have experienced serious misery and suffering, or loss of life.

  As you may have noticed, the above concepts can be placed on a continuum that ranges from the potential world of ideas to the actual world of events. This continuum starts in the world of potential hazards (threats), and ends up in the actual world of disasters. This continuum describes what we call the Security Disaster Development Process

On a purely theoretical level, this boils down to a process of actualization or realization: sometimes, dangerous ideas are realized. More precisely, security threats (ideas) sometimes becomes disasters (destructive events). We point this out for those who are philosophically inclined and wish to pursue these concepts at a more theoretical level.

Types of threats, hazards, and
disasters

We also talk about eight general kinds of security threats, hazards, or disasters. Under each of these eight categories,
you will find a detailed list. In effect, these detailed lists
define
the eight general categories. The following
material will show you what we mean:

1. Terrorist threats, hazards, and disasters

  • Bomb threats, hazards, and disasters

  • Missile threats, hazards, and disasters

  • Chemical threats, hazards, and disasters

  • Biological threats, hazards, and disasters

  • Nuclear threats, hazards, and disasters

  • Hijacking threats, hazards, and disasters

  • Kidnapping threats, hazards, and disasters

2. Criminal threats, hazards, and disasters

  • Death threats, hazards, and disasters

  • Assault threats, hazards, and disasters

  • Extortion threats, hazards, and disasters

  • Kidnapping threats, hazards, and disasters

3. Industrial threats, hazards, and disasters

  • Fire threats, hazards, and disasters

  • Electrical threats, hazards, and disasters

  • Chemical threats, hazards, and disasters

  • Structural threats, hazards, and disasters

  • Mechanical threats, hazards, and disasters

  • Radiation threats, hazards, and disasters

4. Natural threats, hazards, and disasters

  • Fire threats, hazards, and disasters

  • Flood threats, hazards, and disasters

  • Storm threats, hazards, and disasters

  • Volcanic threats, hazards, and disasters

  • Earthquake threats, hazards, and disasters

  • Hurricane threats, hazards, and disasters

  • Tsunami threats, hazards, and disasters

  • Avalanche threats, hazards, and disasters

  • Climatic threats, hazards, and disasters

  • Disease threats, hazards, and disasters

  • Animal threats, hazards, and disasters

5. Technological threats, hazards, and disasters

  • Genetic threats, hazards, and disasters

  • Chemical threats, hazards, and disasters

  • Biological threats, hazards, and disasters

  • Radiation threats, hazards, and disasters

  • Electrical threats, hazards, and disasters

6. Environmental threats, hazards, and disasters

  • Air quality threats, hazards, and disasters

  • Water quality threats, hazards, and disasters

  • Food quality threats, hazards, and disasters

  • Soil quality threats, hazards, and disasters

7. Economic threats, hazards, and disasters

  • Food shortage threats, hazards, and disasters

  • Water shortage threats, hazards, and disasters

  • Fuel shortage threats, hazards, and disasters

  • Housing shortage threats, hazards, and disasters

8. Political threats, hazards, and disasters

  • Legal threats, hazards, and disasters

  • Arrest threats, hazards, and disasters

  • Extortion threats, hazards, and disasters

  • Death threats, hazards, and disasters

  • Torture threats, hazards, and disasters

  • Imprisonment threats, hazards, and disasters

  • Enslavement threats, hazards, and disasters

  As you've probably noticed, there is some apparent overlap between the above eight categories. For example, we classify a fire threat as both an industrial threat and a natural threat. However, if you think about it, you'll recognize that an industrial fire is quite different from a natural fire. Industrial fires usually involve buildings while natural fires include forest fires and grass fires. The same basic logic usually applies to other threats that are listed under more than one category.
How to Perform 
a Human Safety
and Security
Analysis
As you may recall, the first section of our Human Safety and Security Plan asks you to perform a Human Safety and Security Analysis. The purpose of such an analysis is to identify the most serious human security risks so you can do something about them. More precisely, you will use the results of such an analysis to develop, document, and implement your Human Safety and Security Program. Your Human Safety and Security Program will address the risks identified by your Human Safety and Security Analysis.

Our Human Safety and Security Analysis has five parts:

  1. Perform a Human Safety and Security Threat Analysis

  2. Perform a Human Safety and Security Exposure Analysis

  3. Perform a Human Safety and Security Vulnerability Analysis

  4. Perform a Human Safety and Security Disaster Analysis

  5. Perform a Human Safety and Security Risk Analysis

Each of these five parts will be introduced below.

 
  1. Perform a Human Safety and Security Threat Analysis

A Threat Analysis starts by asking you to identify the most dangerous threats to human safety and security. It asks you to consider eight kinds of potential threats: terrorist, criminal, industrial, natural, technological, environmental, economic, and political. Next it asks you to estimate the probability that each of these potential security threats will turn into an actual hazard.

 
  1. Perform a Human Safety and Security Exposure Analysis

An Exposure Analysis starts by asking you to study how people become exposed to or come into contact with various safety and security hazards. It asks you to think about how people get exposed to eight types of security hazards: terrorist, criminal, industrial, natural, technological, environmental, economic, and political. Then it asks you to estimate the probability that people will actually become exposed to these safety and security hazards.

 
  1. Perform a Human Safety and Security Vulnerability Analysis

A Vulnerability Analysis starts by asking you to identify the things that make people vulnerable to safety and security hazards. It asks you to identify the things that make people vulnerable to eight kinds of hazards: terrorist, criminal, industrial, natural, technological, environmental, economic, and political. Next it asks you to determine how vulnerable people are to these safety and security hazards.

 
  1. Perform a Human Safety and Security Disaster Analysis

A Disaster Analysis starts by asking you to study what happens to people during a disaster. It asks you to study what happens to people during eight types of disasters: terrorist, criminal, industrial, natural, technological, environmental, economic, and political. Then it asks you to estimate how much human misery and suffering would actually occur during a disaster.

 
  1. Perform a Human Safety and Security Risk Analysis

A Risk Analysis asks you to study the risks that threaten human safety and security. More precisely, it asks you to start by studying the results of the previous four analyses. In particular, it asks you to:

  • Study the most dangerous threats to human security.

  • Study the security threats that are likely to become hazards.

  • Study how people become exposed to security hazards.

  • Study the things that make people vulnerable to hazards.

  • Study what happens to people during serious disasters.

  • Study the misery and suffering that occurs during disasters.

  On the basis of this information, you can then identify the most serious risks to human safety and security. You can then identify the terrorist threats that pose the most serious risk to human safety and security, the natural threats that pose the greatest risk, and so on for each of the eight types of threats.

At this point, you may be wondering how you're going to use these rather abstract ideas. Don't worry. It's all quite practical. It all comes together very nicely in one simple Human Safety and Security Analysis Form. This Form is, of course, part of our Human Safety and Security Management Plan.

  But before you can actually carry out a Human Safety and Security Analysis, you need to select a Target Group. These are the people who need to be protected. Target groups can include at least the following:
  • Children

  • Employees

  • Passengers

  • Customers

  • Contractors

  • Suppliers

  • Workers

  • Guests

  • Patients

  • Athletes

  • Clients

  • Visitors

  • Guards

  • Citizens

  • Leaders

  • Students

  • Managers

  • Audiences

  • Organizations

  • Communities

  • Companies

  • Factories

  • Offices

  • Hotels

  • Hospitals

  • Airports

  • Seaports

  • Stadiums

  • Buildings

  • Stores

  • Malls

  • Plants

  • Churches

  • Temples

  • Mosques

  • Synagogues

  Once you've completed a Human Safety and Security Analysis for each Threat, you're ready to develop, document, and implement your own unique Human Safety and Security Management Program.
 

Praxiom

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Overview of our Human Safety and Security Management Plan

Detailed Preview of our Human Safety and Security Management Plan

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Updated on November 3, 2011. On the Web since May 25, 1997.

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